Undergraduate Research Interns

 

2007-2008....Toni Walters (USA) focused her efforts on the reproductive habits of Chestnut-collared Swift (Cypseloides rutilus).

2007......David Jaffe (USA) conducted his own research with Harold on the breeding habits of the poorly known Yellow-billed Cacique (Amblycercus holosericeus).

2007......Ben Freeman (USA) worked with Harold studying the nests of a variety of bird species. In particular he conducted his own study on the parental care of Long-tailed Tapaculo (Scytalopus micropterus).

2007......Eliot Miller (USA) worked extensively at Yanayacu, but also traveled with Harold to southern Ecuador where he helped with the study of a variety of nests, including his own research on the first nest of the Gray and Gold Warbler (Basileuterus fraseri) and an extensive review of nesting in the chat-tyrants (Ochthoeca).

2006.......Adrian Soria (Ecuador) worked with Harold studying the nesting and parental care of the Pale-eyed Thrush (Platycichla leucops).

2006......Rebecca Lohnes (USA) worked with Harold filming the nest of Golden-headed Quetzal, documenting the feeding and brooding behavior of the adults and growth of the nestling.

2005.....Ryan L. Lynch (USA) assisted Konrad Halupka and Harold film the nest of an Andean Solitaire. In addition he worked with Harold studying the larval shelter building behavior of the skipper butterfly, Noctuana haematospila (Hesperiidae).

2005......Ryan Lynch (USA) was able to travel with Harold to southern Ecuador and study the breeding of a variety of birds. While there he conducted a study, led by Inca Harms, on the first nest of Swallow-tailed Nightjar. (Photo by Inka Harms)

2005......Inka Harms (Germany) was able to travel with Harold to southern Ecuador and study the breeding of a variety of birds. While there she conducted her own study on the first nest of Swallow-tailed Nightjar. (Photo by Inka Harms)

2005......Inka Harms (Germany) spent much of her time at Yanayacu working in the Paramo above the station. She worked with Harold studying the nesting habits of a variety of paramo birds, in particular the poorly known Tawny Antpitta, Grallaria quitensis. (photo by Murray Cooper)

2005.......Lana Jamieson (Canada) spent only a short time at Yanayacu, but was involved with Harold in studying the first nest of Highland Motmot (Momotus aequatorialis). (Photo by Mitch Lysinger)

2004.......Nadine Harbers (Holland) helped study the nesting behavior of Blackish Tapaculo (Scytalopus latrans). (Photo by Eliot Miller)

2004........Colin Rombough (Canada) traveled to southern Ecuador with Harold and helped to study the nests of several species of birds. In particular he was instrumental in studying the first nest of Chusquea Tapaculo (Scytalopus parkeri). (Photo by Murray Cooper)

2004......Amelie Bucker (Germany) spent endless hours studying a variety of nests at Yanayacu, including the breeding behavior of Blackish Tapaculo (Scytalopus latrans), Spectacled Whitestart (Myioborus melanocephalus), and Cinnamon Flycatcher (Pyrrhomias cinnamomea).

2004........Andy McClean (U.K) also had an opportunity to travel with Harold to southwestern Ecuador to study the nest of Long-wattled Umbrellabird (Cephalopterus penduliger) with several other researchers and students. (Photo by Murray Cooper)

2002-2003........Erin Hannelly (USA) worked on a variety of projects at Yanayacu. In particular she helped produce two papers (A...and...B) on the rare Peruvian Antpitta (Grallaricula peruviana). She also wrote her own papers on Tropical Gnatcatcher (Polioptila plumbea) while in the lowlands, and Yellow-bellied Chat-Tyrant (Ochthoeca diadema) while at Yanayacu.

2001.....Scott Kerr (Canada) spent time helping Harold study a variety of nests at Yanayacu. In particular, he helped to study the breeding habits of Green-fronted Lancebill hummingbird (Doryfera ludovicae).

2001.......Jill Hayhurst (Canada) spent time helping Harold study a variety of nests at Yanayacu. In particular, she helped to study the breeding habits of Green-fronted Lancebill hummingbird (Doryfera ludovicae).

HOME